SOCIAL JUSTICE MINISTRY

Nov 19, 2015     Category: Social Justice

Social Justice Committee



The Social Justice Committee meets here at All Saints’ Cathedral once a month.

If you are interested, or just curious, please feel free to attend.



We are hoping to see you! on Tuesday, May 31st at 7 p.m. at the Cathedral

Why? Come and hear Sharon Pasula, the Diocesan Oskapewis (Aboriginal Cultural and Educational Helper) speak to us about how we can support our church’s commitment to truth and reconciliation with our indigenous brothers and sisters.

  • What our church has done: Last fall we hosted the Diocesan-sponsored Truth and Reconciliation Exhibit for a period of 5 weeks. This exhibit introduced at least 2,000 people to the history and culture of our indigenous neighbours.  We have also hosted some events presented by Sharon Pasula.

Can we stop at these great first steps? Please come and join us to continue this work!



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 03 Apr 2016

Speak out for those who cannot speak, for the rights of all the destitute. (Proverbs 31:8)

The Plan to End Poverty

Change the Conversation

The final, and in many ways the most important, of EndPoverty’s recommendations is:

Launch a collaborative broad-based community engagement and education initiative to change people’s attitudes about poverty

EndPoverty seeks to build a movement. A movement is not a plan or a campaign – it’s something that emerges from the community and takes on a life of its own. It is an idea that a community champions in big and small ways. This movement would have three objectives:

  1. Enable Edmontonians to re-frame how they see and respond to poverty;
  2. Mobilize Edmontonians to be part of or take actions on solutions; and
  3. Engage other Edmontonians to join the EndPovertyEdmonton movement.

 

Changing people’s attitudes about marginalized groups is an integral part of Christian social justice ministry. EndPoverty recommends building on “local creative initiatives” that could come from churches. It asks for “diverse tools for communication and engagement” – one of which could be liturgy – and “conversations on resilience and strengths, discrimination and racism” – which can be informed by scripture. Churches would be excellent places to host awareness-raising events involving people from diverse backgrounds.

Social Justice Ministry insert #28

 



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 27 Mar 2016



 

She puts her hands to the distaff, and her hands to the spindle. She opens her hand to the poor, and reaches out her hands to the needy. (Proverbs 31:19-20)

The Plan to End Poverty

Invest in Our Poverty-Free Future

The third category of EndPoverty recommendations looks at the root causes of poverty:

  1. Grow social enterprises to build sustainable livelihood and assets
  2. Invest in food security-oriented enterprises aimed at increasing food access and gainful employment
  3. Partner with business, industry, community organizations and other stakeholders to create a community development corporation
  4. Plan and implement a system of early learning and care
  5. Reduce barriers for children and families to access services, including out-of-school care and respite care
  6. Advocate to the provincial government for the implementation of culturally sensitive curricula and for standards that require well-educated staff in all early learning and care centres
  7. Advocate to the provincial government for sustainable, predictable and adequate funding for school-based “wrap-around” services
  8. Keep the individual at the centre in providing care, services and supports

Churches are excellent starting places for social enterprises, which can improve the congregation’s sustainability while reducing poverty. Churches in many places are already leaders in food security, community development, and child care. Unlike many other types of organizations, churches are naturally person-centred.

Social Justice Ministry insert #27



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 20 Mar 2016



 

The blind receive their sight, the lame walk, the lepers are cleansed, the deaf hear, the dead are raised, and the poor have good news brought to them. (Matthew 11:5)

The Plan to End Poverty

Move People Out of Poverty (II)

Last week we looked at the first five EndPoverty recommendations in this category. Here are the rest:

  1. Improve skills training to help people gain sustainable employment
  2. Improve literacy
  3. Reduce barriers to getting information and accessing City programs and services
  4. Help people navigate systems in order to access resources and opportunities
  5. Improve timely access to mental health and wellness services and addictions supports

Churches have had success providing networking and referral for job seekers. They can also set an example by hiring newcomers and other people who face barriers.

Churches have a long history of promoting literacy in conjunction with religious instruction. They are excellent places to communicate information about programs and services, particularly to ethnic groups that may not participate in other community organizations. Churches are often the first point of contact for people who need resources; therefore they could easily act as support hubs.

Churches have an important and often unrecognized role as first responders to mental health issues. They have long been leaders in providing supports such as 12-step programs.

Social Justice Ministry insert #26

 



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 13 Mar 2016



About 70 per cent of the people who are living below the poverty line are working – often two or three jobs. (Mayor Don Iveson)

The Plan to End Poverty

Move People Out of Poverty (I)

The third category of EndPoverty recommendations includes practical ways of dealing with the barriers that keep people in poverty. This category includes a lot of recommendations, so we will spend two weeks on them. The first five recommendations in this category are as follows:

  1. Advocate for livable incomes for Edmontonians
  2. Make transit reliable, accessible and affordable for Edmontonians
  3. Improve and expand transit services
  4. Negotiate with other orders of government to increase funding for affordable and supportive housing as well as rental subsidy programs
  5. Develop a community-based learning project to look at housing and zoning innovations

Churches can set an example by committing to pay a living wage to their staff. A living wage is the hourly rate at which a household can meet its basic needs. Churches can help provide affordable housing by contributing land, capital, and volunteer labour and by advocating for increased funding, as has already been demonstrated through the Capital Region Interfaith Housing Initiative. As landowners in residential communities, churches are often well positioned to explore innovative land use options.

Social Justice Ministry insert #25



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 6 Mar 2016



The righteous know the rights of the poor; the wicked have no such understanding. ~ Proverbs 29:7

The Plan to End Poverty

JUSTICE FOR ALL

The second category of EndPoverty recommendations deals with justice and human rights. Our rights are enshrined in law, but those living with poverty often do not enjoy them in practice. The recommendations are:
1. Eliminate racism
2. Decriminalize poverty
3. Make it easier to vote and participate in elections
4. Make Edmonton a “human rights city”

Churches are often uniquely placed to deal with issues of racism. Some churches that serve the majority population (including All Saints’) have long offered intercultural learning opportunities to their members. Other churches serve visible minority groups and can act as resources to share their experiences.
Churches frequently participate in programs such as fine option that keep people out of prison. Some members have expertise in mediation and restorative justice. Churches are well suited to accompanying people through the legal process and often do so already.

Churches often host polling places. Because they are non-partisan, they have the ability to encourage participation in elections without taking sides.

Members of many religious traditions have experienced discrimination. Religious teachings can provide a philosophical foundation to support human rights.

Social Justice Ministry insert #24



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 28 Feb 2016



We’ve been working toward a renewed relationship, not just looking into the past,        but looking into right now. ~ Bishop Jane Alexander

The Plan to End Poverty

TOWARD TRUE RECONCILIATION

The 28 recommendations of EndPoverty Edmonton fall into five categories. Over the next few weeks we will look at each of these in turn.

The first five recommendations focus on reconciliation with Aboriginal peoples:

  1. Establish an Aboriginal culture and wellness centre
  2. Initiate people-first and trauma-informed policy and practice
  3. Implement a community witness program
  4. Provide opportunities where Aboriginal people in poverty can “show and grow” their talents and abilities
  5. Make systemic changes to better reflect the needs, interests, and culture of Aboriginal people

One of the functions of a culture and wellness centre would be to help establish spaces to host culturally appropriate programs in the broader community. Many churches already host such programs – a notable example is the Truth and Reconciliation exhibit recently held at All Saints’. Clergy are often first responders to Aboriginal people in crisis. Some of them are already ahead of secular providers in people-first and trauma-informed practices, which have strong foundations in religious teaching. Churches are inclusive and accessible gathering places where marginalized people can use their talents in worship and other activities.

Social Justice Ministry insert #23



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 21 Feb 2016



Seek the welfare of the city where I have sent you into exile, and pray to the Lord on its behalf, for in its welfare you will find your welfare. ~ Jeremiah 29:7

The Plan to End Poverty

HOW CAN CHURCHES HELP END POVERTY?

Churches have an impact that extends far beyond their membership. People of faith are people first: we have jobs, live in neighbourhoods, make friends, marry outside our religion, have children who go to public schools, and participate in the wider community in a multitude of ways. Churches can act as bridge builders because, on the one hand, their belief systems give them certain strengths and, on the other hand, their members form a network that carries those strengths out into the wider community.

EndPoverty Edmonton is guided by Statements of Belief that resonate with what we do in church. One of them is that “ending poverty means supporting each and every Edmontonian to feel included and valued.” Churches stay with individuals throughout their life journeys, build rich community networks, and make forgiveness and hope possible through the sacraments. Another EndPoverty belief is that “ending poverty means changing hearts and minds.” Churches do this by gathering for worship, telling a biblical story that helps people make sense of their own life stories, and praying with people when their questions have no ready answers.

Social Justice Ministry insert #22



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 14 Feb 2016



Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has. (Margaret Mead)

The Plan to End Poverty

HOW CAN I SUPPORT EndPoverty EDMONTON?

You are likely already involved in helping to build a poverty-free community if you
• Engage in programs to support your neighbourhood, local school or faith community
• Own, manage or work in a business that’s building a more caring and prosperous community with new solutions and job opportunities
• Provide services and support as part of the social services or not-for-profit sector

To show your support, begin by checking out the EndPoverty Edmonton website: www.endpovertyedmonton.ca. Click on “Count Me In” and sign up to be an EndPoverty Edmonton Ambassador so you can receive information and submit suggestions. You can also follow EndPoverty Edmonton on Twitter (@EndPovertyYEG) and Facebook.

The EndPoverty implementation plan is expected to go to council in April 2016. Watch for the meeting date and try to attend; council meetings are open to the public. Other groups have found that a big turnout at a council meeting can be decisive in getting a crucial motion passed. Aspects of the plan will need support from the provincial government, and you can help by advocating with your MLA.

Social Justice Ministry insert #21



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 07 Feb 2016



The Cree word for “poor” is okitimâkisiw, which loosely translated into English means “a person in need, one who is poor,” or kitimakatchihow, which means “he lives poorly” with no direct reference to money.

The Plan to End Poverty

WHAT IS EndPoverty EDMONTON?

EndPoverty Edmonton is a task force chaired by Mayor Don Iveson and Bishop Jane Alexander and composed of 26 leaders and stakeholders representing a broad array of communities. The vision is to eliminate poverty in Edmonton within a generation (roughly 30 years) and the task force’s mandate is to develop a long-term plan to achieve that vision. The EndPoverty Edmonton Strategy was released in September 2015 and unanimously approved by City Council in December 2015. It contains 28 detailed recommendations that will be discussed in this space over the coming weeks.

EndPoverty’s definition of poverty is “when people lack, or are denied, economic, social, and cultural resources to have a quality of life that sustains and facilitates full and meaningful participation in the community.” The definition is about more than just money, because poverty is more complex than an economic circumstance. You can be monetarily poor, but rich with your traditions, culture and family to sustain you. You can be monetarily rich, but poor without a circle of true friends or values to guide you.

Social Justice Ministry insert #20



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 23 Jan 2016:



“If your brother becomes poor and cannot maintain himself with you, you shall support him as though he were a stranger and a sojourner, and he shall live with you. Take no interest from him or profit, but fear your God, that your brother may live beside you. Leviticus 25:35-36

The Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness

HOPE MISSION

Like other social service agencies working to ending homelessness in Edmonton, Hope Mission, located at 9908-106 Avenue, receives funding from Homeward Trust to locate accommodation and place homeless persons in stable housing, until the time when the end to homelessness becomes a reality, Hope Mission continues supports homeless and impoverished Edmontonians with emergency shelter, hot meals, clothing and spiritual support.

Starting as a soup kitchen in 1929, Hope Mission is now a large not-for-profit Christian social care agency that serves over 1000 free meals daily and offers nightly emergency shelter to more than 500 people without homes

Breakfast, lunch and dinner are served five days a week, plus brunch and dinner on the weekends
The Bargain Shoppe provides clothing, blankets and work wear, while generating revenue in support of their programs and services. Faith-based addictions treatment programs, along with counseling, access to recreation and transitional housing are also available.

Counselors and chaplains reach out and assist those seeking spiritual support.

Hope Mission’s 24/7 Rescue Van, a converted ambulance, responds to calls from Edmonton Police Service, to provide emergency non-medical care to vulnerable men, women, and youth on the street, by offering them food and shelter.

Social Justice Ministry # 18



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert,  13 Dec 2015:



“One of the marvelous things about community is that it enables us to welcome and help people in a way we couldn’t as individuals. When we pool our strength and share the work and responsibility, we can welcome many people, even those in deep distress, and perhaps help them find self confidence and inner healing.”   ~ Jean Vanier, “Community And Growth”

The Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness

NO ROOM AT THE INN

Elizabeth House is a sober short term transitional housing for women, last year Elizabeth House was home to 54 women, as they move from homelessness into homes. Along with three meals a day and a room, Elizabeth House helps women to learn life skills and develop confidence, connect with community, deal with mental health and addiction issues and find employment.

Elizabeth House is also the focus for this year’s No Room at the Inn campaign, the house needs renovations. At the moment the kitchen at Elizabeth House cannot accommodate all the women who stay there.

Many of those who stay at Elizabeth House would like to learn cooking skills and others would benefit from being able to share or practice skills they already have.

Elizabeth House is a place where a woman can learn how to feel confident again after experiencing homelessness and you can help, by contributing to the No Room at the Inn Campaign.

All Saints’ Social Justice Ministry # 15



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert,  06 Dec 2015:



We think sometimes that poverty is only being hungry, naked, and homeless. The poverty of being unwanted, unloved, and un-cared for is the greatest poverty. We must begin in our own homes to remedy this kind of poverty.  ~ Mother Teresa

The Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness

WHO ARE THE PEOPLE WHO BECOME HOMELESS?

We are.

Our parents, our children, our brothers and sisters are all at risk of becoming homeless.

Economics plays a part in creating a situation where people become homeless but sometimes it’s a sudden tragedy. We can never be assured of avoiding tragedy no matter how much we try and prepare and prevent it.

An accident or prolonged illness can begin a series of events that can take away the security we have.

The homeless people we see today on the street might be strangers to us, but tomorrow we might see a relative, an old co-worker or a neighbour.

All Saints’ Social Justice Ministry # 14



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 29 Nov 2015:



“If your brother becomes poor and cannot maintain himself with you, you shall support him as though he were a stranger and a sojourner, and he shall live with you. Take no interest from him or profit, but fear your God, that your brother may live beside you.” Leviticus 25:35-36

The Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness

WHAT ARE THE CAUSES OF HOMELESSNESS?

According to the Calgary Foundation on Homelessness:

Some risk factors that may lead to homelessness include poverty, mental illness, chronic substance abuse, disabilities, abuse, family conflict, no or few social networks, isolation, lack of supportive relationships, lack of education, disruptive childhood experiences.

Trigger events such as financial loss, family crisis, moving/relocation for economic or social reasons, conflict with family, roommate, or landlord, a major health crisis,  a crime — either perpetrated, or as the victim, may lead to the loss of a home.

In such circumstances, a person may find themselves trapped with no address, no financial support (social assistance), have trouble navigating the system for help, and become overwhelmed.

Conditions put on housing such as sobriety, no criminal record, and a good credit history may be difficult to fulfill.

Homelessness can result in employment barriers such as: having no permanent address, a lack of transportation, health issues, insufficient education, poor hygiene and lack of sleep from living on the streets or in a shelter.

Discrimination can also be a very large barrier.

All Saints’ Social Justice Ministry # 13



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 22 Nov 2015:



The Spiritual connection makes us whole “You have noticed that everything an Aboriginal person does is in a circle, we were a strong and happy people, all our power came to us from the sacred hoop of the nation, and so long as the hoop was unbroken, the people flourished. But the white men have put us in square boxes. Our power is gone and we are dying. When we forget the roundness of life, the inter-being of all creatures and the Creator, we lose our sense of true identity and belonging to that very circle.”  Excerpts from Black Elk (Oglala holy man), and comment in last paragraph by Richard Rhor (Fransican contemplative)

The Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness

HOW ARE WE RESPONDING TO THE CULTURAL NEEDS:

How are we responding to the cultural needs of the, disproportionate number of aboriginal people who are homeless? Bent Arrow Healing Society has a Housing First team known as Nikihk that along with the established Housing First Model, of housing and then wrapping individualized supports around each participant has added the following two support positions to the Housing First model:

– A Healing/Trauma Support Worker who collaborates with a trauma recovery specialist to heal the participant.

– The Aboriginal Cultural Spiritual Facilitator provides the participant with cultural and spiritual teachings and teaches how to use them in their daily lives.

– Nikihk’s holistic approach is changing lives.

We encourage you to join us at our next meeting: Tuesday, 27 Nov 2015 at 7:00pm at the Cathedral. Come on along – there is never a dull moment!

All Saints’ Social Justice Ministry # 12



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 15 Nov 2015:



At the Next Social Justice Meeting, HERE AT THE CATHEDRAL, on 24 Nov 2015 at 7:00pm, John Gee will speak about the new plan to end poverty in a generation, and how it connects to the 10 year plan to end homelessness. Come! Listen! Learn! And help end homelessness by sharing what you learn with the people you talk to throughout the week.

The Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness

THE ALL SAINTS’ SOCIAL JUSTICE MINISTRY 

The Call: On 13 Nov 2014, at a public ceremony at City Hall (in which 25 leaders of faith groups renewed their commitment to actively support The 10 Year Plan To End Homelessness), our Bishop Jane called on all the leaders not to sign unless they will take action to support The 10 Year Plan. In her words, she said: “This is not a photo op!” Then she signed to commit our church to actively provide that support.

The Mandate: On 4 Dec 2014, our Dean, The Very Rev Neil Gordon suggested that we form a Social Justice Ministry to support The 10 Year Plan To End Homelessness. At All Saints’ Annual General Meeting, Social Justice was named as one of our ministries. To answer Bishop Jane’s call, our mission is to support The 10 Year Plan To End Homelessness

What do we do? On the third Tuesday of each month, we meet at 7:00pm at the Cathedral. Our agenda focuses on initiatives to support The 10 Year Plan. These include Welcome Home, Find, and Habitat for Humanity, speakers for “Between Services” series, developing information inserts for Sunday leaflets, etc. The meetings open with a reflection relating to homelessness and a prayer. The initiatives that have been proposed are planned using round table brainstorming. In line with Bishop Jane’s call to action, the outcomes of our meetings are actions based on the information that we discuss. The meetings close with the grace.

What is one of our latest initiatives? To encourage you to join us at our next meeting: Tuesday, 27 Nov 2015 at 7:00pm at the Cathedral. Come and join us – there is never a dull moment!

All Saints’ Social Justice Ministry # 11



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 08 Nov 2015:



Community: “Thousands of people live in a community but it is not one of real fellowship until they know each other mutually and have sympathy for one another. A true community has faith and wisdom that illuminate it. It is a place where the people know and trust one another and where there is social harmony.” ~ Mahaparinirvana-Sutra, Buddhism

The Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness

BISSELL CENTRE

An outreach ministry of the United Church, Bissell Centre has been operating continuously for more than 100 years. Its focus has always been on working with the many marginalized people who find themselves in Edmonton’s inner city. Originally they were mainly immigrants from Ukraine, but now the majority is Aboriginal.

Bissell’s mission is to empower people to move from poverty to prosperity. Its programs include child care, employment services, Homeless to Homes using the Housing First model which helps people to move from homeless into homes of their own, mental health services, family support, a drop-in center, a thrift store, and the Moonlight Bay camp at Wabamun Lake.

Their Mission: “Working with others, we empower people to move from poverty to prosperity”.

All Saints’ Social Justice Ministry # 10



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 01 Nov 2015:



The LORD is a stronghold for the oppressed, a stronghold in times of trouble. And those who know your name put their trust in you, for you, O LORD, have not forsaken those who seek you. Psalm 9:9-10

The Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness

FRIDAY COMMUNITY BREAKFASTS

From the first Friday in November 2015 to the last Friday in March 2016, we serve a free, community breakfast every Friday morning, from 7:30am to 9:00am.  These meals consist of oatmeal porridge, pancakes, ham, juice and coffee. Everyone is welcome to come – often they are homeless, unemployed, or the working poor. They all appreciate a meal that they don’t have to pay for out of any wages they might earn.  We also give away winter clothing supplies – but we limit ourselves to NEW toques, gloves, t-shirts, and underwear.

A new addition this year is that Dominique, from the Bissell Centre’s housing department (that uses a Housing First program called ‘Homeless to Homes’), will be on hand to talk with people about finding housing. We will provide more information about this new initiative in a later insert.

How can I help? Come and help cook, serve or clean up. Any time between 6:30am and 9:30am. Come and have breakfast and visit with our guests. Any time between 7:30am and 9:00am.  Donations of funds or new clothing (as detailed above) will be very much appreciated.

For more information, please contact Barb Burrows (780) 434-0790.

All Saints Social Justice Ministry # 9



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 25 Oct 2015:



Looking for something that will enrich your life and the life of someone who is in need? Volunteer with the Welcome Home program and help someone transition from Helpless to Hopeful.

The Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness

OUR COMMITMENT TO THE INTERFAITH HOUSING INITIATIVE

On March 17th, 2011 in Zeidler Hall at the Citadel Theatre where a standing room only crowd watched as leaders of 23 faith communities  gathered together on stage and signed a public commitment to support Edmonton’s 10 Year Plan to End Homelessness.

This was the founding group of the Capital Region Interfaith Housing Initiative. The faith leaders reaffirmed their commitment on November 13, 2014.

Bishop Jane, is one of the signers committed our dioceses to actively support the 10 Year Plan to End Homelessness, by being a member of the Interfaith Housing Initiative.

Since that time All Saints has taken action and become involved.

What is your commitment to help end homelessness?

All Saints Social Justice Ministry # 8



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 18 Oct 2015:



Looking for something which will enrich your life and the life of someone who is in need? Volunteer with the Welcome Home and help someone transition from Helpless to Hopeful!

The Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness

OUR COMMITMENT TO THE INTERFAITH HOUSING INITIATIVE

On March 17th, 2011, in Zeidler Hall at the Citadel Theatre, a standing room only crowd watched as leaders of twenty-three faith communities gathered together on stage and signed a public commitment to support Edmonton’s 10 Year Plan to End Homelessness.

This was the founding group of the Capital Region Interfaith Housing Initiative. The faith leaders reaffirmed their commitment on 13 November 2014.

Bishop Jane, as one of the signatories, committed our diocese to actively support the 10 Year Plan to End Homelessness, by being a member of the Interfaith Housing Initiative.

Since that time All Saints’ Anglican Cathedral has taken action and become involved. What is your commitment to help end homelessness?

All Saints Social Justice Ministry # 7



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 11 Oct 2015:



Is not this the fast that I choose: to share your bread with the hungry, and bring the homeless poor into your house; when you see the naked, to cover them, and not to hide yourself from your own kin? (Isaiah 58:6-7)

The Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness

HOW CAN I GET INVOLVED WITH THE TEN YEAR PLAN TO END HOMELESSNESS?

Learn: about Homelessness in Edmonton by attending information sessions held between services at All Saints.

Join: the Social Justice Ministry

See: Homelessness first hand and Help out with church activities that serve the homeless; Sunday lunch at the Bissell Centre, Inner City Pastoral Ministry, an evening meal at Mustard Seed Church, Hope Mission, Friday morning breakfasts and Thursday lunches here at the Cathedral.

Volunteer: your time at Bissell Center, Boyle Street, the Neighbour Center, Welcome Home program, or the annual Interfaith Habitat Works to help prevent homelessness.

Become Involved: be an advocated for our homeless neighbours to our government.

Participate in conversations, to encourage affordable housing

Support: New affordable housing projects.

All Saints Social Justice Ministry # 6



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 04 Oct 2015:



I will rejoice in Jerusalem, and delight in my people; no more shall the sound of weeping be heard in it, or the cry of distress. No more shall there be in it an infant that lives but a few days, or an old person who does not live out a lifetime; for one who dies at a hundred years will be considered a youth, and one who falls short of a hundred will be considered accursed. (Isaiah 65: 19-20)

The Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness

THE MIRACLE OF THE INTERFAITH HOUSING INITIATIVE!

In the spring of 2010 Mayor Mandel suggested to Archbishop Smith, who was one of the leading figures in the Homeless Commission, that an interfaith group might be formed to support the 10 Year Plan to End Homelessness.

Within a month he hosted a gathering of representatives of faith communities ranging from Buddhist to Zoroastrians.

With lively discussions and great enthusiasm, after one further meeting the Capital Region Interfaith Housing Initiative was established.

Since that historic moment the Homeless Commission has had enquiries from across the nation asking how Edmonton got these diverse faith groups “rowing the boat in the same direction!”

All Saints Social Justice Ministry # 5



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 27 Sep 2015:



How is All Saints’ congregation involved in the plan to end homelessness?

The Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness

ALL SAINTS’ INVOLVEMENT

Bishop Jane, along with 22 representatives from a wide range of interdenominational faith communities, have committed to work toward the goal of eliminating homelessness in Edmonton by 2019.

Each parish in the Diocese is undertaking various initiatives to contribute toward the goal to end homelessness in our city.

The Social Justice Ministry group at All Saints Cathedral headed up by Fraser Williamson has committed to the following interfaith initiatives already in operation.

The Welcome Home project

– Habitat Works

– Find           

Other initiatives are being considered.

Each of these projects needs parishioners to get involved to make the plan to end homelessness a reality.

All Saints Social Justice Ministry # 4



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 20 Sep 2015:



To help those who suffer through homelessness. Our faith obliges us to do this: “They also will answer, Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or needing clothes or sick or in prison, and did not help you?” Matthew 25

Why is the Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness Important?

MEDICINE HAT, ALBERTA

Medicine Hat is the first city in Alberta to declare it has eliminated homelessness!

– Build healthy communities where all members can contribute and reap the benefits of full participation.

– Billions of dollars are saved by getting people off the streets, and into homes to live healthy lives in healthy communities.

Since the program began permanent homes have been secured for 2,909 people who had been living on the streets. The vast majority are in private rental buildings across the city.

84% of the people housed have stayed successfully in their new homes.

All Saints Social Justice Ministry # 3



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 13 Sep 2015:



The wisdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, willing to yield, full of mercy and good fruits (kindly deeds), without partiality and hypocrisy. (Divine Wisdom as described in James 3:17 NKJ)

The Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness

WHAT IS THE “PLAN TO END HOMELESSNESS”?

A program started in 7 cities across Alberta, in 2009 and funded by all three levels of government.

The plan uses a proven model called Housing First.

As a first step, social agencies are contracted to locate and secure suitable housing for chronically homeless persons. Once housed , a Follow-up Support Worker is engaged and works closely with each participant tailoring the supports to each individual that are required to ensure the participants best chance of staying housed is achieved.

In Edmonton the plan is overseen by an organization called Homeward Trust.

Is the Program Working? YES! Regular audits have shown the program is operating effectively.

All Saints Social Justice Ministry # 2



From the Social Justice Committee‘s bulletin insert, 06 Sep 2015:



Ah, you who join house to house, who add field to field, until there is room for no one but you, and you are left to live alone in the midst of the land! Isaiah 5:8-10

How the 10 Year Plan to End Homelessness Began

IN THE BEGINNING…

In the summer of 2007, a crowd of people who had no homes moved their makeshift tents to a vacant lot owned by the province of Alberta after they were evicted by city health officials from the parking lot behind the Bissell Centre.

This placed a large number of our homeless neighbours into direct view of the mainstream public.

The Province was moving to evict the residents of Edmonton’s new ‘Tent City’ when thanks to the media, the citizens of Edmonton were appalled to witness the deplorable conditions and hopelessness that many people in Edmonton were forced to reside in.

The embarrassment and shame that was evoked by the coverage of Tent City compelled our government representatives to action.

By January 23, 2008 the Secretariat to End homelessness was charged with developing a plan to end homelessness in just 10 Years.

All Saints Social Justice Ministry # 1



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